Chicago Reading Africa
a local initiative for readers in search of global perspectives
Install Theme
Our May literary discussion, “Fictive Kin,” will focus on works that reflect the intersection of migration and kinship. Writers of the selected readings include Dinaw Mengestu, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, E.C. Osondu, Tope Folarin and Kima Jones. To view these works online (or download), click here. Read them and join us on Sunday, May 4th at the Black Ink Book Exchange (at the Washington Park Arts Incubator) to discuss. (Note: The Incubator opens at noon, come early to Browse the Black Ink Book Exchange and stay after the discussion for David Boykin’s jam session).
For more details and to reserve your spot, click here.

Our May literary discussion, “Fictive Kin,” will focus on works that reflect the intersection of migration and kinship. Writers of the selected readings include Dinaw Mengestu, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, E.C. Osondu, Tope Folarin and Kima Jones. To view these works online (or download), click here. Read them and join us on Sunday, May 4th at the Black Ink Book Exchange (at the Washington Park Arts Incubator) to discuss. (Note: The Incubator opens at noon, come early to Browse the Black Ink Book Exchange and stay after the discussion for David Boykin’s jam session).

For more details and to reserve your spot, click here.

Chicago Reading Africa in Photos.

See our past events here. Join us at our next event.

Free Library of Philadelphia

—Teju Cole & Dinaw Mengestu

All organizing is science fiction. What does a world without poverty look like? What does a world without prisons look like? What does a world with everyone having enough food and clothing look like? We don’t know. It’s science fiction, and it is as foreign to us as the Klingon homeworld (which is called Q’onos in case you were wondering). But being able to envision it and imagine it means we can begin seeing the steps it would take to move us there.

Walidah Imarisha, Growing Octavia’s Brood: The Science Fiction Social Justice Created (via nomadmanifesto)

Chicago, Check out adrienne maree brown (co-editor of Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction from Social Justice Movements) in conversation with Krista Franklin at the Arts Incubator on Tuesday, April 1st. More details here.

(via nxustruu)

In this video from OkayAfrica, Wangechi Mutu takes us on a brief tour of her first U.S. solo exhibit, A Fantastic Journey. If you’re in the Chicago area, mark your calendar: A Fantastic Journey will be at Northwestern’s Block Museum September 19th - December 7th, 2014.